Friday, October 24, 2014

FF To The Resque

Friday Comic Book Day.

Friend of blog Smurfswacker asked if I could get my hands on the Wonder Woman pages that Frank Godwin is supposed to have drawn. Well I could and here they are. I think. Anyone out there who can confirm it? The second one is from one of those microfiche collections. I apologize for the condition.



Wednesday, October 22, 2014

This Man, This Repeat Offender

Thursday Story Strip Day.

Here is the second instalment (of three) representing almost the whole of Stan Lee and Frank Springer's run of the soap opera spoof Vera Valiant. The April 4 strip is particulary interesting for superhero fans, who may recognize the blurb about the next day's strip from Fantastic Four #51 (possibly the best story Stan Lee ever scrited over Jack Kirby's lay-out).


Coe And Co

Wednesday Advertising Day.

Roland Coe was a terrific cartoonist and may have had more influence then we give him credit for these days. I see a dirct line from his work to that of Bus Blake, for instance.

Quality Rush

Tuesday Comic Strip Day.

I may be showing too much B.C., but every once in a while I come across one that is so perfect...

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Wiseman, Say!

Monday Cartoon Day.

Some time ago I showed a couple of cartoons by Al Wiseman from the pocket gag magazine Zowie. Al Wiseman is mostly know for drawing the Dennis the Menace Sunday pages and comic books for most of the fifties in a style undistiguishable from that of Dennis creator Hank Ketcham. These rare cartoons give us a look at his personal style before he took on Dennis. At the time I noticed how much less cartoons Wiseman sold than Ketcham (and most of them not signed either). Since then I found that he did contribute regularely to Charly Jones' Laugh Book a monthly gag magazine with less emphasis on half nakes ladies and saucy gags than others. He drew mastheads for features, illustrated articles and even did a series of cartoons of pretty ladies you could order. He also drew covers, which he did sign. Here is a look at the forgotten work of a mostly forgotten master.